Adults & Texting While Driving

November 30, 2012
|
|

Texting while driving by adults is just as likely as teens and are substantially more likely to have talked on a cell phone while driving.

Eighty-two percent of adults (those aged 18 and older) now own cell phones, up from 65 percent in 2004. About 58 percent of adults send or receive text messages. By comparison, 75 percent of teenagers (aged 12-17) own a cell phone, and 66 percent text. Forty-nine percent of adults say they have been passengers in a car when a driver was sending or reading text messages.

Overall, 44 percent of adults say they have been passengers of drivers who used their cell phone in a way that put themselves or others in danger, 75 percent of adults say they have talked on a cell phone while driving, and 52 percent of teens aged 16-17 reported talking on a cell phone while driving.

Studies at Virginia Tech and elsewhere show that drivers using phones are four times as likely to cause a crash as other drivers. NHTSA research found that in 2008 there were 5,870 fatalities and an estimated 515,000 people injured in police-reported crashes in which at least one form of driver distraction was reported.

- Ibid 07.05.10.p5